Speakers

Patricia Murugami

Patricia Murugami

Patricia Murugami recently completed her DBA at International School of Management in Paris, France. She wants to spread her ideas on how to unlock your potential. Patricia’s career began in the finance world as an auditor in Kenya. She worked in a male-dominated environment for many years as she was looking for her purpose. Patricia began investigating the high potential women in her organization that weren’t getting heard or growing further. She found a purpose in developing, mentoring and coaching the women in organizations. She is passionate about raising human potential and has found that what really satisfies her is lifting people up in the world and helping them find their authentic voice and purpose.
Since then, she has helped launch and elevate women in 15 leadership programs and has catalysed the growth of another 10 leadership programs across East, West and Southern Africa. Her message is that the solution shouldn’t be all about affirmative action but instead should be about getting to the top in an intentional and purposeful way. She believes that women need to know and harness their feminine power and that humanity should all focus on becoming integrated. Patricia believes that motherhood should be viewed as a positive leadership experience – and that the skills used in a home are also needed to be successful at work.
Patricia wants to spread this idea because she believes that, similarly to how MLK viewed the integration of races, a full integration and appreciation of the contribution of both men and women will lead us to a brighter future, together.

Gemma Garcia Godall

Gemma Garcia Godall

Gemma believes that emotions are the energy that moves ourselves, our teams and organisations. She works as an emotional intelligence consultant to companies that want to develop emotional intelligence of their leaders and teams. Gemma talks about how companies, as they grow, increasingly need to have managers that know how to manage emotions – both within themselves and within the teams. For her, the emotional intelligence of the leader and the team is a key competence that increase or reduce the possibilities to become a high performing team. For example, fear is the ultimate emotion that we need to learn how to handle and discuss in the workplace. Managers need to develop the ability to create the right space to talk about fear and other emotions with their teams. Once we can talk about our feelings, we become truly free and are ready to take decisions together because we can communicate fully with each other. Then we can discover our shared culture openly, make and implement changes, and let that guide our strategy.
Gemma wants to share this with the world because we all make decisions based on emotions and we need to manage them consciously if we want to get the right results. If we could increase the amount of emotional intelligence in our companies, we could start doing things for the right reasons and feel much better with ourselves and with our work environment.

Luis Alvarez Satorre

Luis Alvarez Satorre

Luis has just written a book about how to be the proper CEO. To be a proper CEO, Luis argues that you must be yourself. By yourself he stresses that you are not the job – people follow you, not the position. You need to be resilient – you will be alone in unexpected situations. Luis has just written a book about how to be the proper CEO. To be a proper CEO, Luis argues that you must be yourself. By yourself he stresses that you are not the job – people follow you, not the position. You need to be resilient – you will be alone in unexpected situations. And you need to be humble and curious. Luis breaks down the person into 3 layers – the core layer or the internal personality layer, the interaction layer which drives us to connect with others, and the execution layer which drives us to accomplish the tasks we set for ourselves. He wants to share with us more about the second layer, the one that drives us to connect with others.
Luis believes that work/life balance isn’t a real concept – he says that we have only one life and we have to decide where we spend it. His point is that you can be both a proper CEO and be involved with your loved ones, you just have to understand the difference between time and quality time – choose to be 100% there all the time. He talks of how he connected with his kids when they were very young. While they were too young to understand business, they did understand that there were some numbers that Luis need to take from red to black. Every day when he got home from work his kids would ask how the numbers were and if they were black yet. Then, he would get to ask them about their friends at school and how was soccer practice because he wasn’t trying to hide his business from them but instead involved them in his life and so he was naturally involved in theirs. Luis wants to spread this kind of thinking to the world because he believes that helping working professionals connect with their loved ones will lead to a happier, more integrated world.

Andrew Moll

Andrew Moll

Andrew is a world traveller from the IESE MBA Class of 2019. Hailing from a US town of 3,000 people, he has consistently grown beyond his borders, living or working in 3 different continents.
His story speaks of striking sincerity by building peripheral experiences that allow you to connect and build trust with others. As he says it, any hobby or interest is a genuine route to meeting cool people and building lasting rapport. Curiosity isn’t the means to connection, rather curiosity on its own, leads people to find ways in which they are already connected to those around them.

Kandarp Mehta

Kandarp Mehta

Kandarp Mehta is a professor of Negotiation and Creativity at IESE Business school. He has been teaching his students in his course on creativity how to overcome creative blocks and get back to being a productive creative. Ideas are the currency of life now and most people aren’t ready for the moment when they run out of ideas.
However, Kandarp argues that running out of ideas is actually the norm for creative people. Instead, he advocates several strategies for overcoming these blocks and for developing a sense of humility around the process of idea generation.

Luca Venza

Luca Venza

Luca Venza works with hundreds of MBAs in IESE’s career services department specializing in helping entrepreneurs find their way through the community. In his desire to find technologies that will enable us to solve the burning issues for human kind, Luca has identified the missing element in the mindset that guides investing in the modern world.
Luca believes that investors need to think about speed, innovation, and impact when making investing decisions – the confluence of these which Luca terms transcendental investing. By refocusing our considerable resources on building technologies that have an impact, we’ll move from building technologies that help us hail taxis faster to solving problems that have a real impact on the human experience.

Mavi Sanchez-Vives

Mavi Sanchez-Vives

VR technology is poised to take the world by storm but the true value of the technology isn’t in entertainment. Mavi Sanchez-Vives is a neuroscientist and founder of a company using VR technology to help patients and users learn to manage physical and psychological issues using virtual reality. She works with a concept called ‘embodiment’ which relates to how we see ourselves within VR. If the perspective is in the first person, we ‘become’ the avatar and start to relate to them. Mavi and her team have used this technology with the Department of Justice in Catalonia with perpetrators of domestic violence. In these 15-20 minute sessions, the participant views a domestic violence incident from the perspective of the victim. In ‘embodying’ the victim, the participant experiences first-hand what it’s like to receive abuse and becomes more empathetic towards the victim, with the objective to lower recidivism rates. They are also using this technology with police in New York City having them ‘embody’ through VR members of many different in order to decrease racial bias. Mavi wants to share this with the world why virtual ‘embodiment’ can help everyone to experience the world through the perspective of others and thus become more mentally flexible with their concept of identity and more empathetic towards others.

Marc Catalá

Marc Catalá

Marc is a creative director and visual writer. His ideas revolve around visual language, the universal languages that we can all speak and understand without ever learning. He argues that we as humans think in images as much as words. And that visual language is a more powerful and direct than verbal language. This is why we all find it much easier to interpret a diagram than to read a description and make one ourselves. Diagrammatic thinking allows us to see abstract thought – in fact we use spatial relations to describe concepts such as close or far, big or small. But we as a society never take the time to learn how to speak visual language, we only learn by intuition. We then miss out on the depth of emotion we can convey with pictures or the sheer amount we can communicate in a small space. His view of the future is that the book as a mass media is over, instead we will continue to shift more towards visual forms of media. To prepare ourselves, we should study visual language and learn how images can help us communicate in this universal language.

Cristina de Medrano

Cristina de Medrano

Cristina defines herself as an Agent of Change, her mission in life is to help as many people find their true purpose. Along her journey she has transition from a professional athlete to dentist, and now professional coach around the world.

From national champion to running her own dental clinic, living across 5 different countries, Cristina has come across many challenges on her journey leading her to question the true meaning to her life. Now she wants to share with you her understanding of how her passion has brought to find her true purpose, and wants to inspire us to learn how to identify our purpose in life.

Ying (Ayur) Wu

Ying (Ayur) Wu

Ayur is an entrepreneur and a second year MBA student in IESE. A lawyer by training but a marketer by profession. A TV reporter, a campaign designer, a media, and PR specialist…She was all of them, pouring curiosity and creativity into creating brand moments for clients, until she finally started her own business. In 2015 she left a promising career to focus on her fine jewelry start-up brand in China, designing minimal, modern gold jewelry at honest price for professional women. It is the start of a long journey that requires determination and patience, with many misleading temptations along the way. However, she maintained her business throughout the MBA, and will be returning to it after graduation next month.

Ayur’s story of opportunities and her decision making process in turning them down showcases a new perspective of accessing choices. A story of how to be disciplined with an impulsive, multi-tasking nature, and how to make peace with the consequences of one’s intuitive decisions. Moreover, the benefits of sacrificing alternatives.